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Speech Evaluator

Toastmaster | Public Speaking | Impromptu Speech | Ice Breaking ( first) Speech| Evaluation



Evaluate to motivate!

 

People join Toastmasters to improve their speaking and leadership skills, and these skills are improved with the help of evaluations. Members complete projects in the Competent Communication and Competent Leadership manuals and you may be asked to evaluate their work. At some point, everyone is asked to participate by providing an evaluation. You will provide both verbal and written evaluations for speakers using the guide in the manual. Youíll always give a written evaluation for leadership roles, though verbal evaluations for leaders are handled differently from club to club. Sometimes verbal evaluations are given during the meeting and sometimes they are given privately, after the meeting. Check with your vice president education (VPE) or the Toastmaster if youíre not sure of your clubís method.

Several days before the meeting, review the Effective Evaluation manual you received in your New Member Kit. Talk with the speaker or leader youíve been assigned to evaluate and find out which manual project they will present. Review the project goals and what the speaker or leader hopes to achieve. 

Evaluation requires careful preparation if the speaker or leader is to benefit. Study the project objectives as well as the evaluation guide in the manual. Remember, the purpose of evaluation is to help people develop their speaking or leadership skills in various situations. By actively listening, providing reinforcement for their strengths and gently offering useful advice, you motivate members to work hard and improve. When you show the way to improvement, youíve opened the door to strengthening their ability.

When you arrive at the meeting, speak briefly with the general evaluator to confirm the evaluation session format. Then retrieve the manual from the speaker or leader and ask one last time if he or she has any specific goals in mind.

Record your impressions in the manual, along with your answers to the evaluation questions. Be as objective as possible. Remember that good evaluations may give new life to discouraged members and poor evaluations may dishearten members who tried their best. Always provide specific methods for improving and present them in a positive manner.

If youíre giving a verbal evaluation, stand and speak when introduced. Though you may have written lengthy responses to manual evaluation questions, donít read the questions or your responses. Your verbal evaluation time is limited. Donít try to cover too much in your talk; two or three points is plenty.

Begin and end your evaluation with a note of encouragement or praise. Commend a successful speech or leadership assignment and describe specifically how it was successful. Donít allow the speaker or leader to remain unaware of a valuable asset such as a smile or a sense of humor. Likewise, donít permit the speaker or leader to remain ignorant of a serious fault: if it is personal, write it but donít mention it aloud. Give the speaker or leader deserved praise and tactful suggestions in the manner you would like to receive them.

After the meeting, return the manual to the speaker or leader. Add another word of encouragement and answer any questions the member may have.

By giving feedback, you are personally contributing to your fellow membersí improvement. Preparing and presenting evaluations is also an opportunity for you to practice your listening, critical thinking, feedback and motivation skills. And when the time comes to receive feedback, youíll have a better understanding of the process

 


When you are the Evaluator

After every prepared speech, the speaker receives an evaluation.

After you have presented a few speeches, you will be asked to serve as an evaluator and will evaluate one of the prepared speakers or the meeting. In addition to your oral evaluation, you also will give the speaker a written evaluation using the guide in the manual.
The evaluation you present can make the difference between a worthwhile or a wasted speech for your speaker. The purpose of the evaluation is to help the speaker become less self conscious and a better speaker. This requires that you be fully aware of the speaker's skill level, habits, and mannerisms, as well as his or her progress to date. If the speaker uses a technique or some gesture that receives a good response from the audience, tell the speaker so he or she will be encouraged to use it again.
Before The Meeting
  • Review carefully the Effective Speech Evaluation manual which you received in your New Member Kit,
  • Talk with the speaker to find out the manual project he or she will be presenting. Review the goals of the speech and what the speaker hopes to achieve. Find out exactly which skills or techniques the speaker hopes to strengthen through the speech.
  • Evaluation requires careful preparation if the speaker is to benefit. Study the project objectives as well as the evaluation guide in the manual, Remember, the purpose of evaluation is to help people develop their speaking skills in various situations, including platform presentations, discussions, and meetings. Achievement equals the sum of ability and motivation. By actively listening and gently offering useful advice, you motivate members to work hard and improve. When you show the way to improvement, you've opened the door to strengthening their ability.
When You Enter The Meeting Room
  • Look for the speaker and get his or her manual.
  • Meet briefly with the general evaluator to confirm the evaluation session format.
  • Then confer with the speaker one last time to see if he or she has any specific things for you to watch for during the talk.
During The Meeting
     
  • Record your impressions of the speech in the manual along with your answers to the evaluation questions. Be as objective as possible. Remember that good evaluations may give new life to discouraged members and poor evaluations may dishearten members who tried their best. Remember, always leave the speaker with specific methods for improving.
  • When introduced, stand and give your oral evaluation. Begin and end your evaluation with a note of encouragement or praise. Though you may have written lengthy responses to manual evaluation questions, don't read the questions or your responses. Your oral evaluation time is limited. Don't try to cover too much in your talk-possibly one point on organization, one on delivery, and one on attainment of purpose with a statement about the greatest asset and a suggestion for future improvement.
  • Praise a successful speech and specifically tell why it was successful. Don't allow the speaker to remain unaware of a valuable asset such as a smile, a sense of humor, or a good voice. Don't allow the speaker to remain ignorant of a serious fault or mannerism; if it is personal, write it but don't mention it aloud. Give the speaker the deserved praise and tactful suggestions in the manner you would like to receive them when you are the speaker.

After The Meeting
Return the manual to the speaker. Add a verbal word of encouragement to the speaker, something that wasn't mentioned in the oral evaluation.

( http://pptoasters.8k.com/eval.html )


Hints for the Evaluator

The job of the evaluator is one of the most important at a meeting. It is through the feedback they recieve that speakers are able to improve.

  • Remember you are evaluating the speech, not the speaker.
  • Review the speakers goals with them prior to the meeting
  • Make an outline utilizing the manual recommendations as a guide.
  • Make notes during the speech using the outline
  • When presenting the evaluation
    • Review the goals of the manual and speaker
    • Make a note of what they did right and why it worked
    • Review 2-3 items they can focus on for improvement; those things that would make the biggest difference if they improved in those areas
    • If possible, offer examples of how they could have done something differently that would i mprove their presentation.
    • End on a positive note

    Resources
    Effective Speech Evaluation (Included in new member kit)
    A Toastmaster Wears Many Hats ...Roles of a Member

    (http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/ilena/hinteval.htm )



    Evaluations are one of the most unique, and most important, aspects of the Toastmasters Program. The purpose of the evaluator is to provide the speaker with constructive feedback, positive reinforcement and areas that need improvement.

    The Program Schedule lists Evaluators and Speakers. When the General Evaluator calls you before the meeting, you will be told the speaker you have been assigned.

    At the meeting, obtain the speaker's manual and review the purpose of the speech and suggested methods for achieving that purpose. Review the questions listed in the evaluation guide. Listen attentively to the speaker. This is one of your best opportunities for improving your listening skills. You may also wish to jot notes while the speaker is speaking.

    When the speaker is finished, write your evaluation on the Evaluation Guide page in his or her manual. Organize your thoughts for the oral evaluation. The oral evaluation should be a mini-speech with greetings, opening, body and conclusion or summary. The General Evaluator will call you at the appropriate time for delivery of your evaluation.

    Start your evaluation with a positive point and end with a positive one if you want to keep the speaker's attention and friendship. However, be sure to include some points for improvement in the middle. Remember that you are giving your opinions and reactions, so be careful about using strong dictatorial words like "wrong,", "never" or "always."

    "I think" is a good phrase for an Evaluator to use. In addition to the points covered in the Evaluation guide some other points to consider are:

    How the speaker performed compared to previous speeches you have heard the speaker deliver,

    Body language (eye contact, gestures, facial expressions for example)

    Speech organization

    Enthusiasm

    Use of voice

    Self-confidence

    Use of visual aids

    How well prepared?

    Word selection, vocabulary

    Other items of special interest to speaker

    While it is not your duty to editorialize about the speech content, a comment about the speech's value in making others think and vividness of descriptions are certainly in order.

    Please do not cover areas that the speaker cannot change, such as stuttering. Those would only serve to embarrass the speaker and the other members.

    When offering points that need improvement, try to also offer possible means for improving these points. Be as specific as possible. More advanced (in ability, not necessarily in membership length) members need more "Picky" evaluations. For the beginner, particularly for an Ice Breaker, be careful not to overload them with negatives. Remember that we like to help others build self-confidence as they improve.

    A summary of the speaker's major strengths and a couple of the most important weaknesses or "needs improvements" is helpful at the end of your evaluation.

    You will be speaking primarily to the speaker you are evaluating. However, do not ignore the rest of the audience since they, too, may pick up some self-improvement tips from your comments.

    The evaluation should be delivered in a standing position near your chair. Target time for a speech evaluation is 2 minutes.

    ( http://nwtoastmasters.org/evaluator.htm )


Purpose:

Evaluations are what makes Toastmasters the special place that it is for so many members. Through the systematic process of performance and feedback over and over again, we learn and grow. 

Evaluation is the process of positive reinforcement and constructive feedback on how to become better in future presentations. It is a tricky skill to acquire, but one that will follow you into your dealings with others outside of Toastmasters.

After you have presented a few speeches, you will be asked to serve as an Evaluator and will evaluate one of the prepared speakers for the meeting. In addition to your oral evaluation, you will also give the speaker a written evaluation from the manual. The purpose of the evaluation is to help the speaker become less self-conscious. This requires that you become fully aware of the speaker's skill level habits and mannerisms as well as his or her progress to date.

Before the Meeting:

Review the evaluation guide you receive when joining Toastmasters. It is an excellent source of information on the how "to's" of evaluation.

Call the speaker you will be evaluating and review the project that he/she will be giving. Ask what their goals for the speech are, and what the speaker hopes to achieve in terms of reaching the audience other then the manuals objectives. Offer any assistance the speaker needs to prepare for their speaking engagement.

At the Meeting:

Ensure you get the manual from the speaker so that you can complete the evaluation guide for the project.

Listen to the speaker, taking notes that can be used to create and evaluate the speaker.

Complete the evaluation guide for the speaker. This will possibly give rise to other points that should be covered in your oral evaluation.

When called upon by the General Evaluator, deliver your two to three minute evaluation of the presentation.

Praise a successful speech and specifically tell why it was successful. Don't allow the speaker to remain unaware of a valuable asset such as a smile, a sense of humor, a good voice. Don't allow the speaker to remain ignorant of a serious fault or mannerism; if it is personal, write it but don't mention it aloud. Give the speaker the deserved praise and tactful suggestions in the manner you would like to receive them when you are the speaker. When pointing out a point that requires work do so only if you are able to offer a way of improving it.

Above all do not white wash when offering your evaluation. It is only through true and positive feedback that we can all learn and grow.

After the meeting:

Make a point to meet with the speaker after.

Return the manual to the speaker. Add a verbal word of encouragement to the speaker and you can at that point discuss the other points you couldn't bring out in the oral evaluation.

Tips and Traps:

Evaluation is one of the more difficult skills in Toastmasters to develop. It requires concentration and helps us to develop our analytical skills. The key is not to get bogged down in detail during the speech. Keep your notes brief so that you are not writing while the speaker is making an important point.

Two minutes is not a long time. Pick out the most important strengths and suggestions to discuss with the speaker orally. Other points can be written in the speaker's manual to be read and discussed later.

( http://www.chezsylvain.com/ph_tm/roles/evaluator.htm )


Speech Evaluation

"Be positive, be encouraging, uplift the spirit, and inspire the speaker to improve."

Introduction
In Toastmasters whenever a member gives a speech there is always another member, who is called an evaluator, allocated to give some feedback to the speaker so that the speaker can improve. A speaker is allocated a different evaluator for each speech this ensures a varied perspective.
These notes outline some important aspects of evaluation and presents some ideas on how to become a better evaluator.
The objectives of a speaker is to effectively communicate a message with the audience. Some basic forms of feedback provided by the audience to the speaker are smiles, laughs, frowns, whispers or yawns.


Responsibility
It is the responsibility of the evaluator to provide an honest reaction to the speakers presentation, reasons for the audiences reaction, and outline constructive examples in order to help the speaker improve.


Purpose
An Evaluator must provide constructive, helpful feedback and suggestions for improvement as well as outlining why the speech is succeeding or failing with the audience. Evaluation must build self confidence and encourage the speaker to uncover and develop their latent talents.


Feedback Criteria
Be aware of the speakers objectives and speakers progress. Each speech has its own objectives and to effectively evaluate, these objectives must be known. By being familiar with the speakers past performance, progress, goals and speaking style ensures a better evaluation.


  • Speech Elements
    A speech can be evaluated by dividing it up into the following parts.

* Content
* Organisation
* Delivery

The content refers to the substance of the speech eg. topic, ideas, facts and examples etc.
The organisation is how the speech was arranged eg. opening, body, conclusion and logically set out etc.
Delivery is the speech mechanics such as hand gestures, eye contact, and voice modulation etc.
Evaluators should not become so involved with the delivery of the speech that they forget about its content and organisation.

 


  • Personalise your language
    When evaluating a speaker be aware that it is only your opinion and therefore respond with terms such as

" I felt .............."
" It seemed to me .........."
" My reaction was ........."

Avoid phrases such as

" You should ........."
" You must ..........."
" Don't ..........."

Where appropriate demonstrate what you mean.
There is no right or wrong only your reaction to the speech.
Use the HOW TO approach

" I felt that my reaction would have been ...... if you had done ...."
" I believe that you would have accomplished your purpose more easily if you had done ........"
"My impression is that if you concentrate on ...... you would ......"

( http://www1.tpg.com.au/users/schleter/tie_eval.htm )


Evaluators


After every speech, an evaluation is made. After you have presented a few speeches, you will be asked to serve as an EVALUATOR and will evaluate one of the prepared Speakers for a meeting EVALUATORS give both an oral evaluation and a written evaluation in the Speakers manual. Your evaluation can make the difference between a worthwhile or a wasted meeting for your Speaker. The purpose of the evaluation is to help the Speaker become less self conscious. This requires that you become fully aware of the Speaker's skill level, habits and mannerisms as well as his or her progress to date. If there is a technique the Speaker uses or some gesture made that receives a good response from the audience, tell the Speaker so he or she will be encouraged to use it again.

Before the meeting

Review carefully the Effective Speech Evaluation manual which you will receive in your new member packet from Toastmasters International.

Communicate with the Speaker who you are evaluating to find out the manual project he or she will be presenting, the goals of the speech and what the Speaker hopes to achieve, in terms of reaching the audience. Find out exactly which skills or techniques the Speaker hopes to strengthen through the exercise.

Study the objectives of the project as well as the evaluation guide in the manual.

Remember that the purpose of evaluation is to help people develop their speaking skills in various situations, including platform presentations, discussions and meetings.

Achievement equals the sum of ability and motivation.

Listen actively and offer gentle, useful advice. When you show the way to improvement, you've opened the door to strengthening their ability.

Follow the procedure outlined below

During the speech, record your impressions in the manual along with your answers to the evaluation questions. Be as objective as possible. Remember to leave the Speaker with specific methods for improving his or her speaking

When introduced, stand and say, "Mr./Madam General Evaluator or Mr./Madam Toastmaster, fellow Toastmasters, Guests, and especially you, (name of speaker), then give your oral evaluation report. Begin and end your evaluation with a note of encouragement or praise. Though you may have lengthy responses to manual evaluation questions, don't read the questions or your responses. Your oral evaluation time is limited. Don't try to cover too much in your talk - possibly one point on organization, one on delivery and one on attainment of purpose with a statement about the Speaker's greatest assets and a suggestion for future improvement.

Praise a successful speech with specifics. Inform the Speaker of valuable assets such as a smile, a sense of humor, a good voice. Tactfully inform the Speaker of a serious fault or mannerism (or, depending on the its nature, write it down but don't mention it aloud). Give the speaker the deserved praise and tactful suggestions you would like to receive if you were the Speaker.

After the meeting

Return the manual to the speaker. Add an additional verbal word of encouragement.

( http://www.cambridge-speakers.fsnet.co.uk/evaluators.html )


EVALUATOR
The evaluator's goal is to help the speaker be less self-conscious and to become a better presenter. To do this, you should be aware of the speaker's skill level, habits, mannerisms, and the general progress so far. Encourage the speaker to reuse techniques that receive a good response from the audience.
Before the meeting
  • Review the Effective Speech Evaluation manual.
  • Check with the speaker to find out the current project; review the objectives with the speaker and ask skills he/she hopes to strengthen with this speech.
  • Study the objectives of the speaker's project and the evaluation guide in the manual.
On arrival at meeting
  • Locate the speaker and get his/her manual and inquire about specific things to watch.
  • Confirm the evaluation session with the general evaluator.
During the meeting
  • In the speaker's manual, record your impressions and answer the evaluation questions.
  • Keep your comments as objective as possible and make specific suggestions for improvement.
  • When introduced, stand at the podium to give your evaluation.
  • Begin and end with praise or encouragement.
  • Do not read the manual evaluation questions and your responses.
  • Keep your oral evaluation brief; include, perhaps, one point on organization, one on delivery, and one on the achieved goal.; mention the greatest asset and make a suggestion for improvement.
  • Give praise for a successful speech and explain what made it successful.
  • Don't allow a speaker to remain unaware of a serious fault, but you do not need to mention it aloud.
After the meeting
  • Return the manual to the speaker.
  • Add additional words of encouragement.

( http://www.lcs-i.com/titalkers/evaluate.htm )


Introduction

At Toastmasters, every speech is evaluated. After you have presented a few speeches, you will be asked to serve as an evaluator and will evaluate one of the prepared speakers for the meeting. In addition to your oral evaluation, you will also give the speaker a written evaluation from the manual. Your evaluation can make the difference between a worthwhile or a wasted meeting for your speaker.

The purpose of the evaluation is to help the speaker become less self-conscious. This requires that you become fully aware of the speaker's skill level, habits and mannerisms, as well as his or her progress to date. If there is a technique the speaker uses or some gesture made that receives a good response from the audience, tell the speaker so he or she will be encouraged to use it again.

 

Before the Meeting

  • Review carefully the Effective Speech Evaluation manual which you received in your new member kit from World Headquarters.
  • Talk with the speaker to find out the manual project he/she will be presenting. The interview should include the goals of the speech and what the speaker hopes to achieve. Find out exactly which skills or techniques the speaker hopes to strengthen through the exercise.
  • Evaluation requires exacting preparation if it is to be of value to the speaker. Study the objectives of the project as well as the evaluation guide in the manual. Remember, the purpose of the evaluation is to help people develop their speaking skills in various situations, including platform presentations, discussions and meetings. Achievement equals the sum of ability and motivation. By actively listening and gently offering useful advice, you motivate members to work hard and improve. When you show the way to improvement, you've opened the door to strengthening their ability.

Upon Arrival at the Meeting

  • Look for the speaker and get his/her manual.
  • Meet briefly with the general evaluator to confirm the evaluation session format.
  • Then confer with the speaker one last time to see if he/she has any specific things for you to watch for during the talk.

During the Meeting

  • When called upon by the Toastmaster to give the speaker's objectives, briefly explain the purpose of evaluating speeches, then read the objectives from the speaker's manual. Conclude with the speaking time range.
  • During the speech, record your impressions of the speech in the manual along with your answers to the evaluation questions. Be as objective as possible. Remember that good evaluations may give new life to encouraged members and poor evaluations may dishearten members who tried their best.
  • Present your verbal evaluation when called upon by the General Evaluator. Be sure to report several effective things the speaker did, and couch any criticism as helpful suggestions the speaker may try next time.
  • Remember to always leave the speaker with specific methods for improving his or her speaking and encouragement to speak again soon.

After the Meeting

  • Meet with the speaker to return his/her manual, in which you have provided the written evaluation.
  • Discuss your evaluation with the speaker and answer any questions the speaker may have.

( http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Ithaca/3092/duties/eval.html )

 
 
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